Can coronavirus cause autism in my unborn baby? I’m pregnant and worried.

Can coronavirus cause autism in my unborn baby? I’m pregnant and worried.

Can coronavirus cause autism? In, short… maybe? There is no direct causal relationship between anything and autism. There’s no exact gene. There’s no exact chemical. There’s no exact environmental cause of autism. Well, at least not one all the experts can agree on. Everything we know is inconclusive, so basically we’re not sure. This may fill you with any number of emotions from fear to relief, and that is not only normal it is to be expected. You are a mom or dad (attentive dads are pregnant along with us moms, don’t @ me) and you want to make sure your baby is healthy.

Can coronavirus cause autism?

Can coronavirus cause autism?

Is There a Virus that Causes Autism

Rather than asking if coronavirus cause autism in unborn babies, try posing the question as if there is a direct relationship between any virus and the presence of ASD, try to look at it from a different perspective. Try to look at it from the perspective of maternal health. Any virus may be a virus that causes autism. To gain better perspective, we have gathered some information from Psychology Today for the Seth’s Mom family

Like everyone else, I’m struggling to evaluate the potential impact of the corona virus outbreak. As I write, precautionary measures are being taken across the globe, with different approaches being adopted by different governments, reflecting the different perceptions of risk and of the extent of the pandemic. Scientific and medical advisors, doing their best to anticipate to where this pandemic will go, are advising governments, desperately hoping to make the right choices for their people.

One problem they all face is in assessing the risk to different groups within society.  The elderly are particularly vulnerable, particularly those with pre-existing medical conditions.  The young seem to be less effected, a relief for many parents.  But what about the unborn?  What precautions should pregnant women by taking?

Guidance has emerged on both sides of the Atlantic for women in pregnancy[1].  The message is that there is no evidence that babies in the womb are at risk.  Indeed, evidence suggests that corona-type viruses don’t cross the placenta, and case studies have led the UK Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists to conclude that, ‘Expert opinion is that the fetus is unlikely to be exposed during pregnancy’. This is reassuring, and the expert advice is that women in pregnancy should adopt approximately the same measures to avoid exposure as the rest of the population, and take similar steps for self-isolation should they suspect that they have become infected.

Neuroscientists working on neurodevelopmental disorders, however, might spot that one issue has been overlooked. There is good evidence that severe exposure to viral infection during the first trimester is associated with an increased risk of neurodevelopmental disorders[2].  Perhaps the clearest evidence relates to autism, where in one robust study, the risk of a child being subsequent diagnosed with autism increased almost three-fold following exposure to a severe viral infection during the first trimester[3]. To be clear, these were not simply mild cases of the sniffles: the infection had to be serious enough to warrant hospitalisation.  To be clear also: the risk to the child remained low.  The population incidence of autism is roughly 1%, so even if tripled, the overwhelming majority of pregnancies deliver neurotypical children.

But could the same be true for Covid19, if it doesn’t infect the fetus? Well actually it could because the fetus doesn’t need to be exposed to the virus directly.  Experimental evidence suggests that the problem isn’t the virus itself, rather it results from the mother’s response[4]. Infection causes the mother’s immune system to produce cytokines – signalling molecules the activate the body’s defences and contribute to the development of the fever. While the virus itself may not cross the placenta, the cytokines do, and they impact the development of the fetus. It is this cytokine storm that seems to raise the risk of developmental disorder in the baby.

CLICK HERE to read the full article.


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Demystifying Developmental Disabilities: fetal alcohol syndrome

Having Another Child After Having One With Autism, a Dad’s Perspective(Opens in a new browser tab)

Where is Seth’s Mom? At the Honestly Autism Day event!

INDIVIDUALIZED EDUCATION PROGRAM

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3 month rule and dating… and autism. Just wait new parents.

Intellectual Disability: Features, Symptoms, Treatment

Your child is diagnosed with autism. CONGRATULATIONS!

Autism symptoms. What do they look like?

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Where is Seth’s Mom? Gateway to Success Learning Center

Disability marriage. A family is not impossible for adults with ASD.


NEXT STEPS…

Share your story with the community. Click here to contact us about doing a SETH TALK.

Interested in becoming a guest writer for Seth’s Mom. Click here to contact us.


External Resources

Genetics Home Reference – NIH

Support program: Autism Sibling Support Initiative

Support program: Sibling Support Project

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council

Maryland Early Intervention and Special Education Services

Administration for Community Living

Pathfinders for Autism

Disability Scoop

Maryland Preschool Special Education

Maryland Department of Education Division of Early Childhood

Asperger’s can not stop Time’s Person of the Year: Greta Thunberg

Asperger’s can not stop Time’s Person of the Year: Greta Thunberg

Asperger’s does not limit potential

Our babies diagnosed with Asperger’s, and those self-advocates diagnosed with Asperger’s, don’t look at life in terms of limits. We look at possibilities and potential. We seek out ways we can contribute to this world and make it better not only for us but for others. Special needs is a misnomer. What it really means is our community needs are special compared to the neuro-typical and non-disabled community.

But let’s set aside the comparison for a moment and focus on how much we have common. We can simply look to the accomplishments of Greta Thunberg and see that although she is diagnosed with Asperger’s syndrome it does not mean she cannot make the same (or even greater) impact as someone who is not diagnosed. Like any other human being she used her passion to shed light on an important topic. Her focus and determination inspired many others to speak out and share their concern about climate change.

About Greta, Asperger’s is just one part of why she is

But, this is not about politics or where you stand in the climate debate. This is about recognizing that having an Asperger’s diagnosis does not limit ability. Being diagnosed is simply an acknowledgement of how you interact with the world and process information. According to Time

Thunberg is 16 but looks 12. She usually wears her light brown hair pulled into two braids, parted in the middle. She has Asperger’s syndrome, which means she doesn’t operate on the same emotional register as many of the people she meets. She dislikes crowds; ignores small talk; and speaks in direct, uncomplicated sentences. She cannot be flattered or distracted. She is not impressed by other people’s celebrity, nor does she seem to have interest in her own growing fame. But these very qualities have helped make her a global sensation. Where others smile to cut the tension, Thunberg is withering. Where others speak the language of hope, Thunberg repeats the unassailable science: Oceans will rise. Cities will flood. Millions of people will suffer.

We all have the opportunity, and ability, to be the change we want to see in the world.


RELATED ARTICLES TOPICS AND PAGES

Support Groups: Howard County Autism Society

What are the symptoms of autism in a 3-year-old?

Disabilities jargon: What is stimming behavior?

Disabilities jargon: Sensory processing disorder

Therapy: What is sensory integration therapy? Is sensory integration better than ABA?

Demystifying developmental disabilities: Say no to the “R word”, understanding intellectual disability


NEXT STEPS…

Share your story with the community. Click here to contact us about doing a SETH TALK.

Interested in becoming a guest writer for Seth’s Mom. Click here to contact us.

 


External Resources

Autism Society

Mayo Clinic

Genetics Home Reference – NIH

Support program: Autism Sibling Support Initiative

Support program: Sibling Support Project

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council

Maryland Early Intervention and Special Education Services

Administration for Community Living

Pathfinders for Autism

Disability Scoop

Maryland Preschool Special Education

 

 

 

Demystifying developmental disabilities: What is cerebral palsy?

Demystifying developmental disabilities: What is cerebral palsy?

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITIES EXPLAINED, WHAT IS CEREBRAL PALSY

A developmental disability (DD) is any number of congenital (from birth) physical, learning, language, and behavior conditions. DD impairs daily functioning such as speaking, walking, and motor coordination. Although the symptom severity can improve overtime, these conditions last the person’s lifetime. Because DD occurs before and during the developmental period, symptoms may go unnoticed until delays meeting developmental milestones are noticed. Keep in mind, that everyone develops at a different pace, but developmental milestones provide a general indicator of what skills children “should” have by certain age. For example, typically by 6 months a baby should be able to roll in both directions, respond to their own name, and place things in their mouth.

The CDC offers a pretty good list of milestones. CLICK HERE to take a look, after you read the rest of this article 😉

Cerebral palsy explained

Cerebral (brain) palsy (paralysis and/or involuntary tremors), or CP, is a neurological developmental disability that impacts coordination and how the body moves. Symptoms can include

  • lack of muscle coordination when performing voluntary movements (ataxia);
  • stiff or tight muscles and exaggerated reflexes (spasticity);
  • weakness in one or more arm or leg;
  • walking on the toes, a crouched gait, or a “scissored” gait;
  • variations in muscle tone, either too stiff or too floppy;
  • excessive drooling or difficulties swallowing or speaking;
  • shaking (tremor) or random involuntary movements;
  • delays in reaching motor skill milestones; and
  • difficulty with precise movements such as writing or buttoning a shirt (National Institute of Neurological Disorders, 2019.)

CLICK HERE to learn more about CP. You will also find a very handy glossary to help you with some of the more complex terminology.


RELATED TOPICS PAGES AND ARTICLES

Ableism… is this a real thing?

I can’t stand my disabled brother! Silent struggle of siblings of the disabled

SETH TALK – my family and my autistic son

What are the symptoms of autism in a 3-year-old?

Activities and events for disabled children – KEEN Greater DC special needs activities

IEP jargon. What are developmental milestones?

SSI or SSDI. What to know when applying for disability benefits.

Where is Seth’s Mom? Doing a podcast with Maryland Financial Advocates


NEXT STEPS…

Share your story with the community. Click here to contact us about doing a SETH TALK.

Interested in becoming a guest writer for Seth’s Mom. Click here to contact us.

 


External Resources

United Cerebral Palsy Foundation

Mayo Clinic

Genetics Home Reference – NIH

Support program: Autism Sibling Support Initiative

Support program: Sibling Support Project

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council

Maryland Early Intervention and Special Education Services

Administration for Community Living

Pathfinders for Autism

Disability Scoop

Maryland Preschool Special Education

Maryland Department of Education Division of Early Childhood

Para-transportation for the disabled. Free rides from Lyft to your job.

Para-transportation for the disabled. Free rides from Lyft to your job.

By Shaun Heasley from Disability Scoop

Para-transportation. Lyft Jobs Access Program Offers Free Rides To Job Seekers With Disabilities.

Lyft’s new Jobs Access Program is aimed at easing transportation concerns for people with disabilities and other groups as they seek employment. (Lyft)

In an effort to help people with disabilities access job training and get hired, one of the nation’s leading ride-sharing services plans to offer free or discounted rides.

Lyft’s Jobs Access Program will provide complementary or lower-cost rides to individuals with disabilities and other targeted groups in more than 35 markets across the U.S. and Canada.

The company said rides will be available to get to or from job training programs, interviews and to get back and forth from work for the first three weeks of employment before new hires typically get their first paychecks.

“For the unemployed, reliable transportation to a job interview or to the first few weeks of work can mean the difference between successful, long-term employment and lost opportunities,” Lyft said in a statement about the new initiative launched late last month. “We are focused on communities that stand to benefit most from short-term transportation support, ranging from veterans to individuals with disabilities.”

The ride-sharing service is partnering with nine organizations — including Goodwill and the National Down Syndrome Society — to connect with people in need of transportation.

CLICK HERE to read the full article


RELATED ARTICLES TOPICS AND PAGES

Ableism… is this a real thing?

SETH TALK – THE SOCIAL WORKER AND THE IEP PARENT

Mom Thanks Metro Police Officer who Helped her Autistic Son

Where is Seth’s Mom? Doing a podcast with Maryland Financial Advocates

Haircut Tips for Autistic Children

SETH’S MOM DISABILITY NEWS AND ENTERTAINMENT NETWORK

Study Raises Questions About Promising Autism Therapy

Time to vent: The disability transportation road to redemption in Baltimore City

Penn-Mar Human Services disabilities spotlight: Finding the champion within

Technology, learning, autism, special education – our friends at Awake Labs

“Community-based” gets a new definition. New expectations. Is there new money?

Where is Seth’s Mom? At the Honestly Autism Day event!


NEXT STEPS…

Share your story with the community. Click here to contact us about doing a SETH TALK.

Interested in becoming a guest writer for Seth’s Mom. Click here to contact us.


External Resources

Support program: Autism Sibling Support Initiative

Support program: Sibling Support Project

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council

Maryland Early Intervention and Special Education Services

Administration for Community Living

Pathfinders for Autism

Disability Scoop

Maryland Preschool Special Education

Maryland Department of Education Division of Early Childhood

Mom Thanks Metro Police Officer who Helped her Autistic Son

Mom Thanks Metro Police Officer who Helped her Autistic Son

From FINDINGCOOPERSVOICE

Mom Thanks Metro Police Officer who Helped her Autistic Son

For 2 years I picked up my son from his Autism Program five days a week.

While I waited for him, I sat in the parking lot and watched the metro trains drive by.

My son loves trains.

And every day I would watch a young mom, with a baby strapped to her chest, try to get her young, autistic son out of the building and to the train.

I’d watch her hold onto him on the platform. I watched him drop to the ground and roll.

I watched her panic. I could see it all over her face.

And for 2 years, 5 days a week, I said a silent thank you that I didn’t have to bring my son, who loves trains, on a train to get home.

I know he couldn’t do it safely. And the thought of being trapped on a train with him and passengers, where the norm is to sit and be quiet, made me almost ill.

I think about that young mother often and wonder if she is still riding the train with her much older autistic son now.

Today, I came across this viral story about the kindness of a police officer.

Taylor Pomilla knows first-hand the challenges of raising a young autistic boy.

“For those of you that don’t know, when you have a child with autism, your child will have some good days and then they will have some bad ones,” Pomilla wrote in a Facebook post on Friday. “Today was one of those bad days.”

Pomilla and her son, Andrew, were taking the metro ride home after she picked him up from school. It’s about a 45-minute ride depending on delays.

“As long I keep him occupied with his iPad or my phone he will sit patiently in our seat. Of course I do always have fruit snacks or candy handy, in case he starts trying to get up or move,” Pomilla wrote.

Andrew was having a particularly bad day, according to Pomilla.

“Andrew was persistent on wanting to get out of the seat to stand in the middle of train while moving and running back and forth through it,” she said. “I kept trying everything to get him to sit, but he just wouldn’t (this fight went on for 20 min), that is when he his regular toddler tantrum turned into a meltdown, or what I call, the point of no return for him.”

The metro ride home took a turn for the worst.

“He started rolling on the floor, screaming, his shoe fell off and he flung it across the train,” Pomilla wrote. “Then he starts the kicking, hitting, pulling my hair while everyone in rush hour stares on the train, most thinking I was a bad parent who had an out of control child, even though really he can’t help it.”

CLICK HERE to read the full article.


RELATED ARTICLES PAGES AND TOPICS

Ableism… is this a real thing?

Autism jargon: what is SIB or SIBs?

SETH TALK – my family and my autistic son

My autistic baby is growing up. Yikes! What’s a transition plan?

3 month rule and dating… and autism. Just wait new parents.

Autism speech. Speech-language support for autistic high school students

Study Raises Questions About Promising Autism Therapy

ActuallyAutistic. From people first language to self identifying language.

Disabilities jargon: What is stimming behavior?


NEXT STEPS…

Share your story with the community. Click here to contact us about doing a SETH TALK.

Interested in becoming a guest writer for Seth’s Mom. Click here to contact us.

 


External Resources

International Bipolar Disorder Foundation

Mayo Clinic

Genetics Home Reference – NIH

Support program: Autism Sibling Support Initiative

Support program: Sibling Support Project

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council

Maryland Early Intervention and Special Education Services

Administration for Community Living

Pathfinders for Autism

Disability Scoop

Where is Seth’s Mom? At the Honestly Autism Day event!

Where is Seth’s Mom? At the Honestly Autism Day event!

Doc Mo Crashed the Honestly Autism Day Event

Well, not really. Doc Mo attended the 2019 Honestly Autism Day event, which, in her opinion was a huge success. Providers, parents, policy makers, all kinds of stakeholders gathered to discuss new autism support initiatives and share innovative training and support techniques. One of the most interesting training sessions involved behavior management and law enforcement advocacy. We’ll share the slides from the training in a future article.

The theme for 2019 was passion, persistence, perspective and autism. Passion for how we love our family… HARD… and how we fight for them. We’ve all seen the “warnings” about special needs momma bears and the passion they have for their adorable cubs. Some of you are that momma  😍and what would we do without you. The persistence it can take to get the necessary supports for your child or for yourself is the stuff of legend. Years long waiting lists. Endless meetings. Trying new behavior therapy techniques. Sometimes, it seems impossible but we keep at it because we do what is necessary for as long as it takes. Perspective. Not just yours as a caregiver but also the perspective of autistic individuals and their contribution to their care.

Honestly Autism Hosts

This fun and informative event is hosted by the Autism Society of Baltimore Chesapeake every year. They describe the event as

A day devoted to understanding autism and is presented by the Partnership Project, which is a collaboration of committed volunteers from the Autism Society of Baltimore-Chesapeake, Baltimore County Public Schools, and the Department of Special Education at Towson University. It is held in April to celebrate Autism Awareness month. Parents, family members, professionals and people with autism come together to listen, ask questions and learn from each other. Experienced speakers share their knowledge of vast topics related to autism and individuals with autism give open and honest insight into their lives on the autism spectrum. It is a positive, uplifting day filled with revelations and shared ideas.

Whether you’re a professional, parent, or self-advocate add this event to your calendar and come out with us EVERY YEAR.


RELATED TOPICS ARTICLES AND PAGES

Where is Seth’s Mom? Doing a podcast with Maryland Financial Advocates

Ableism… is this a real thing?

Mom. Dad. You’re messing up… and it’s OK. Disabilities parenting perfection. And imperfection.

SETH TALK – THE SOCIAL WORKER AND THE IEP PARENT

Where is Seth’s Mom? Walk with Choosy health and fitness event

Haircut Tips for Autistic Children

Time to vent: The disability transportation road to redemption in Baltimore City

Study Raises Questions About Promising Autism Therapy

3 month rule and dating… and autism. Just wait new parents.

Honestly Autism Day was amazing! Congratulations Baltimore Autism Society.


NEXT STEPS…

Share your story with the community. Click here to contact us about doing a SETH TALK.

Interested in becoming a guest writer for Seth’s Mom. Click here to contact us.

 


External Resources

Baltimore Autism Society

Mayo Clinic

Genetics Home Reference – NIH

Support program: Autism Sibling Support Initiative

Support program: Sibling Support Project

Maryland Developmental Disabilities Council

Maryland Early Intervention and Special Education Services

Administration for Community Living

Pathfinders for Autism

Disability Scoop

Depression and Bipolar Support Alliance