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Howard County, “FAMILY LEARNING WEEKEND 2018”

May 19 @ 9:00 am - May 20 @ 3:00 pm UTC+0

Powerful Parents: Pulling It All Together

Attendees will:

  • Learn about care coordination
  • Create a care map
  • Learn how to navigate school and medical records
  • Bring their boxes and bags of records and will be giving supplies and time to organize
  • Understand the meaning of Medical Home
  • Understand the importance of Finding and keeping balance in your life
  • This is a free workshop, a limited number of hotel rooms are available
  • All meals are included

This is an adult only event, childcare is NOT available. 

Space is limited. REGISTER TODAY! 

For more information contact 

Cheri Dowling at cad800@aol.com, 443-277-8899  or  Donna Riccobono at donnaric@umd.edu 

Register Here: https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07ef7ejmii531b903b&oseq=&c=&ch=

Details

Start:
May 19 @ 9:00 am
End:
May 20 @ 3:00 pm
Website:
https://events.r20.constantcontact.com/register/eventReg?oeidk=a07ef7ejmii531b903b&oseq=&c=&ch=

Venue

Sheraton Columbia Town Center Hotel
10207 Wincopin Circle
Columbia, MD 21044 USA
+ Google Map
Website:
https://www.ppmd.org/venue/sheraton-columbia-town-center-hotel/

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